Pittsburg Christian Advocate

1834-1870 Deaths and Marriages Gleaned from the Pittsburgh Christian Advocate

The Pittsburgh Conference Journal began publication February 1, 1834. On October 28, 1840 the name was changed to The Pittsburgh Christian Advocate. It continued for ninety-eight years until, having become a casualty of the depression, it was merged with The New York Christian Advocate.

Throughout its history The Pittsburgh Christian Advocate was published in Pittsburgh. During the entire time it served all the territory of the original Pittsburgh Conference, thus serving Erie, North-East Ohio, West Virginia and Pittsburgh Conferences.

The publication started with a circulation of about 700, costing $2.00 per annum. It consisted of four pages, 13” x 21” in size. By 1835 circulation had risen to 1,900. Before 1850 the number of pages was increased to eight. In 1912 circulation reached 42,986. At that time the format had been changed to 32 pages, 9” x 12”. It was what the prospectus had said it would be “a religious newspaper, containing a review of literary and scientific improvements, reporting progress and needs of religious institutions within our section of the United States”. It often included a sketch of foreign as well as domestic news.

The Advocate maintained a file of its issues. This file was bound and consists of sixty large volumes, containing 5,114 weekly issues. It is a valuable documentary record of Methodist life and work in the Pittsburgh area from 1834 to 1932. These volumes are now in the custody of the General Commission on Archives and History at Drew University, Madison, New Jersey.

  • 1834 – May 17 & 24, July 26, and December 4
  • 1835 – April 23, May 28, September 10 and December 10
  • 1836 – October 20 and November 3
  • 1837 – March 9 and December 28
  • 1838 – July 12 and October 25
  • 1839 – January 24 through March 14, April 11 and May 9
  • 1840 – pages only from October 1 & 8 and December 16
  • 1844 – June 26
  • 1845 – pages only from August 13
  • 1855 – no marriages listed for April 3

Read and Download the Various Record Books

1 thought on “1834-1870 Deaths and Marriages Gleaned from the Pittsburgh Christian Advocate”

  1. Looking for death certificate & birth certificates from my great grandmother, they were coal miners at the Pittsburg coal co., in Moon Run 1899. She had 10 children there, and died there abt 1921. Any advice would be GREATLY appreciated. Thank you, Michelle

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